Find Your “Sweet Spot” in Life

For nearly five years I was actively involved in young adult ministry: two years as a discipleship trainer in a missional program designed to equip the millennial generation as modern-day missionaries, and almost three years as the College and Young Adult pastor at an evangelical megachurch. In both these ministries I would speak at conferences, educating pastors and other leaders from the older generations on the similarities and differences of Gen. Y.

At a total North American population of close to 80 million, the “Millennials” are still very misunderstood, much like the “Yuppies”, “Hippies”, and “Flappers” of generations past. But Millennials, Gen. Y., young adults or simply “twenty-somethings” as some call them, represent a unique opportunity not only for ministry, but also in fields like medicine, science, and innovations in technology. They represent a new generation of global leaders in every sector of society.

By far the most common questions I encountered while counseling college students were questions of calling, purpose, and finding meaning in life. While there are a number of great resources that address these topics from a general stance, Quarter-Life Calling by my good friend Paul Sohn is the first book that I am aware of, to tackle the big questions of life, from the perspective of a young adult, head on.

I have known Paul for the better part of six years. We have had many great conversations and mastermind discussions about life, faith, and leadership since we first met while interacting on a blog post about Christian leadership. He is truly a dear brother in the Lord and is one of the most authoritative voices I know on discovering calling. If I had to describe Paul in one word, it would be intentional. He is intentional about adding value to others, about being salt and light, and about helping people discover their true identity in Christ. It’s no wonder that Christianity Today named his blog one of the “Top 33 Under 33 Millennials to follow”.

At a time when the Western church is at a hinge point in history. The largest generation America has ever seen is also largely missing from many church gatherings. One of the most significant findings during my immersive study into this transient generation, is that those in the Generation Y demographic are genuinely interested in spiritual matters and are searching for meaning in their life. As the research has shown, Millennials want to have an impact on the world.  That should be very encouraging for pastors and ministry leaders. Young adults are open to hearing the Good News of Jesus Christ, and now with Quarter-Life Calling 

they now have a discipleship tool to help them understand how to make a life, not just a living; how to work as worship, not as a curse; and how to make the biggest impact on others with the small dash between the numbers on their gravestones.

Let my good friend Paul Sohn speak into your life and share from his vast experiences and wisdom beyond his years. Quarter-Life Calling will help you demystify the concept of vocation, or calling, teach you how to think with your legacy in mind, and how to use your passions to serve a hurting world.

I highly recommend this amazing book, and if you are in your twenties, encourage you to read it and find your “sweet spot”.

 

 

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About Joshua Lee Henry

Joshua Lee Henry is an executive leadership coach and organizational health consultant, with a background in pastoral ministry, business-2-business sales, and nonprofit management. He serves both pastors and CEO's, helping them to multiply the positive impact of their churches and companies within their communities, to "Advance the Kingdom to Transform Society".
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